This diagram depicts the arrangement of riblets on the inside surface of a pipe, for a study conducted by Ohio State University chemical engineer Konrad Koeltzsch and his colleagues from the Dresden University of Technology in Germany. [Graphic courtesy of Ohio State University.]
Using this pipe channel, Ohio State University chemical engineer Konrad Koeltzsch and his colleagues from the Dresden University of Technology in Germany studied how the angle of riblets on the inside of a pipe affect fluid flow. The experiments took place in an underground laboratory in Germany, where temperature fluctuations and vibrations that would interfere with the experiment could be minimized. [Photo courtesy of Ohio State University.]
Ohio State University chemical engineer Konrad Koeltzsch and his colleagues from the Dresden University of Technology in Germany studied how the angle of small grooves, called riblets, affect the flow of fluids such as air or water. The researchers lined a pipe with this grooved film, which was created by technology company 3M. Each V-shaped groove measures 150 micrometers across -- approximately twice the width of a human hair. [Photo courtesy of Ohio State University.]

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