Embargoed for release until Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2001, 8:30 a.m. EST, to coincide with presentation at the Geological Society of America annual meeting in Boston.

LARGEST FOSSIL COCKROACH FOUND; SITE PRESERVES INCREDIBLE DETAIL

A modern American cockroach stands atop a fossilized cockroach from 300 million years ago -- the largest complete fossil of a cockroach ever found. Ohio State University geologists and their colleagues retrieved the 3.5-inch fossil from a coalmine in northeastern Ohio. This typical American cockroach measures only 1.5 inches long. The line drawn on the map of Ohio marks the approximate latitude in Columbiana County where the fossil was found. [Photo by Jo McCulty, courtesy of Ohio State University.]
Cary Easterday, a master's student in geological sciences at Ohio State University, examines a fossilized cockroach from 300 million years ago -- the largest complete fossil of a cockroach ever found. Ohio State University geologists and their colleagues retrieved the 3.5-inch Arthropleura pustulatus fossil from a coalmine in northeastern Ohio. The modern American cockroach perched atop the fossil measures only 1.5 inches long. [Photo by Jo McCulty, courtesy of Ohio State University.]
The 7-11 Mine, so named because it rests at the intersection of Ohio State Routes 7 and 11 in northeastern Ohio, contains many fossils of plants and animals from 300 million years ago -- all preserved in unprecedented detail. [Photo courtesy of Ohio State University.]
In this largest-ever complete fossil of a cockroach ever found, details such as veins in the insect's wings and splotches that indicate a color pattern are visible. The four-inch cockroach lived 300 million years ago -- 55,000 years before the first dinosaurs. [Photo courtesy of Ohio State University.]
In this mosaic, Cary Easterday, doctoral student in geological sciences at Ohio State University, has traced the features visible on the 300 million-year-old cockroach fossil. Veins branching through the wings are marked in yellow and blue, while the remains of antennae and legs, curled under the insect's body, are marked in red. [Photo courtesy of Ohio State University.]

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